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An Adventure at Paradise Beach


The cart hardly fit down the narrow streets
Chris and I decided to visit Paradise Beach- over 5 kilometers away from Asilah with beautiful scenery and surfboards to rent (supposedly). At the advice of a local, we haggled for a ride on a two-wheeled horse cart. With the price agreed upon, we hopped on Yaseen's cart pulled by his horse Carlos. Carlos protested work with tail flicks and pinned ears, but he knew every bump  and turn in the road. He didn't shy a single time at any of the big scary vehicles that buzzed, honked and roared past him from all directions.

We wound through the narrow streets of town, cantered on a two lane highway, crossed fields of crops and squeezed through a busy market on the way to the beach. The sunny ride was made even better by our chats with Yaseen in an awkward combination of broken Spanish, French, and English. He and I talked horses while Chris attempted to take a nap- a futile endeavor on the bumpy ride.

Menstrual Cups
A must for all adventurous ladies!

Pictured is a MeLuna Medium Mini (no longer available) with ball tip

I've been using menstrual cups for over ten years. They are the best feminine product ever, and I think every menstruating woman should own one.

A menstrual cup is a critical piece of gear for any adventurous woman, but more than that, menstrual cups are beneficial for all menstruating women and the environment.

I never go anywhere without mine, and it is such a relief to know that I just need this one item- no worrying about finding tampons in remote areas of foreign countries. No worries about find places to dispose of used products. This tiny cup is all I need.

Super Easy DIY Travel Deodorant

DIY Tiny Custom Deodorant
I am so picky when it comes to deodorant, and have never found my favorite kind abroad. I typically travel with a full size tube when I'll be gone for a long time, but this technique is better for shorter trips. It's also a great way to customize the scent of your deodorant. Just buy an unscented stick and add your own essential oils or fragrance for a custom scent. Want to eliminate chemicals from your deodorant? Check out this chemical-free recipe from Scratch Mommy.





Supplies:

  • Solid deodorant
  • An empty deodorant tube 
  • Knife
  • Microwave
  • Small glass bowl
  • Sink and paper towels
  • Optional fragrance


  • No More Jet Lag


    I am a jet lag wizard. I manage to avoid jet lag without drugs or sleep aids. In December I flew home from Hong Kong to North Carolina- a 13 hour time difference with no jet lag.
    Catching some sleep in ATL after an all-nighter.
    It may be 3pm in Georgia, but is midnight in my destination

    Jet lag is the worst, especially if you're on vacation. You don't want to be exhausted while trying to enjoy your adventure, and then you definitely don't want to feel you have to "recover" from vacation once you get home and head back to work. For me, I have to avoid jet lag because I often have to work the first day I arrive in a new country. The first time I flew to the other side of the world, I really didn't even think about it until it happened. My first few days were so rough. I remember thinking "what's wrong with me?" while I desperately tried to stay awake at 3pm.

    Now, I rarely experience jet-lag because I follow my jet lag protocol which includes altering eating drinking and sleeping habits only during travel.

    Traveling Light: Ultimate Guide to Men's Travel Clothes

    Tony doing some yoga in Yosemite wearing Prana Stretch Zion Shorts

    Another pair of Prana Stretch Zion Shorts
    The clothes you bring on your journey should be:
    • wrinkle resistant
    • stain resistant
    • fast drying
    • multi-functional (can you hike in your dinner pants?)
    • have large, secure pockets
    • comfortable








    Why are these qualities important? 
    When we travel, we don't know what we'll run into around the corner. Laundry facilities are rarely accessible, rain storms come out of nowhere, and there are always spontaneous adventures to partake in. 

    You might spend a morning hiking and the afternoon sampling wine. You'll have more time to do both if you don't have to stop by your hotel room to change clothes. 

    You'll be able to wash your clothes in your sink at night and they'll be dry by morning. 

    You also want clothes, boxers, and socks whose smell won't induce vomiting after wearing them for two or three days. 

    Raid your Closet
    Before you buy anything, its time to go through your closet.You probably already have several pieces in there that would be great for travel.

    Traveling Light: Ultimate Guide to Women's Travel Clothes

    The North Face Gore-Tex Packlite Jacket and Lululemon shorts
    The key to successful travel clothes is making sure that what you are wearing is not only comfortable and functional, but also reflects your personal style. The tips and suggestions here will help you use clothes you already own into travel clothes, turn stylish finds into multi-functional pieces and buy new items to fit your needs.

    The clothes you bring on your journey should be:
    • wrinkle resistant
    • stain resistant
    • fast drying
    • multi-functional
    • have secure pockets
    • be comfortable

    Wayfinder Ali with bull elephant in Thailand
    At an elephant sanctuary in Thailand, wearing 
    Patagonia Quandry Shorts and a C9 top from Target


    Why are these qualities important? 
    Adventure is full of the unexpected. Laundry facilities are rarely accessible, rain storms come out of nowhere, and there are always spontaneous adventures to partake in. 

    You might spend a morning hiking and the afternoon sampling wine. You'll have more time to do both if you don't have to stop by your hotel room to change clothes. 

    You'll be able to wash your clothes in your sink at night and they'll be dry by morning. 

    You also want clothes, underwear and socks that won't start to stink after wearing them for more than a day or two.

    Raid Your Closet
    Before you buy anything, its time to go through your closet.You probably already have several pieces in there that would be great for travel. Here is what to look for:



    How To: Pro-deals on Outdoor Gear

    Outdoor gear is expensive, and if you're like me, you're hard on your clothing and equipment. I take great care of my gear and use it until it is absolutely dead. Seriously, my favorite top from Patagonia (the R1 Pullover) is still kicking after six years, but I'm wearing it around with holes in the elbows. My friends are probably embarrassed to hang out with me in public.
    The holes have gotten worse since this photo was taken, I will probably patch them.....
    While I take great care of my gear, and sometimes spend hours repairing it, sometimes its just time to let go. Zippers corrode, crotches rip, straps break. The worst part is replacing it. If that item is even still available, it is probably expensive. I suppose the term expensive is relative, but $200 to me is a lot of money. That top in the photo retails at $120. Ouch. My trail sneakers are around $100. Everything adds up so quickly. I've decided to create a guide to getting pro-deals. Keep reading to learn how.

    Traveling Light - How to pack for International Travel [Infographic]

    For the past several years, I have been traveling abroad working as an outdoor educator. I live (literally) out of a backpack. The places I go vary from luxurious hotels to bamboo huts with no modern amenities. I am in jungles, on mountains and by the sea. My bags get dropped, dragged, strapped to trucks, tractors and even elephants now and then. I've endured carrying too much stuff and missing an important item, having emerged with a method that works. I hope that my tips and tricks will make your packing easier, more efficient and effective. To help us all pack better, I've created this flow chart. 

    Does it work for you?


    Here is a photo of what I packed for a 6 month trip to Asia. Everything fit in those two bags. The blue backpack was my carry-on and my laptop bag was my "personal item" and fit under the seat. 


    Grains of Salt......Things to know before we continue.....
    • I have an unhealthy obsession with tiny things. Seriously I have the worlds tiniest, and cutest, tin of Tiger Balm, among other things like nail clippers and tweezers and pens and......
    • You should never have more than two bags. One on your back and one on your front. Otherwise you'll be miserable trying to carry everything around on subways and in airports. I have broken this rule, mainly when I knew I would have an apartment to live in. Getting from the airport to the apartment and back was not fun....
    • I don't trust the airlines and therefore make every attempt to not check anything. Many of the tips in this series will be aimed at getting everything into a carry-on and "personal bag", and capitalizing on the carry-on allotments. 
    • I am an adventure instructor. My travel focus is more of a cross between a tourist backpacker and a wilderness instructor. None of my bags have wheels and fashion is not a top priority. If you're planning to spend a year in southeast Asia keep reading. If you're planning a shopping spree in Paris, some tips may not fit your trip. 
    • I generally go for overkill. Why use a regular stuff sack when I could use a waterproof one? 

    Ready to get started? Check out these two posts for men's and women's travel clothes.